Arludo Science Platform – Links to the NSW Syllabus

The Arludo Science Platform is mapped against the NSW Syllabus in science, maths, and digital technologies for students from years 3 to 12 in Australian schools. Our science worksheets for individual games can easily be extended into other areas such as English and Art.

Select a tab below to explore the individual links in each year.

You can also download a simplified, single-page PDF version of these links here.

Looking for the Australian Curriculum (ACARA) Links? Check them out here.

Skill Outcomes

ST2-1WS-S – questions, plans and conducts scientific investigations, collects and summarises data and communicates using scientific representations

ST2-2DP-T – selects and uses materials, tools and equipment to develop solutions for a need or opportunity

ST2-3DP-T – defines problems, describes and follows algorithms to develop solutions

 

Living World

ST2-4LW-S – compares features and characteristics of living and non-living things

ST2-5LW-T – describes how agricultural processes are used to grow plants and raise animals for food, clothing and shelter

 

Physical World*

ST2-9PW-ST – describes how contact and non-contact forces affect an object’s motion

 

Earth and Space*

ST2-10ES-S – investigates regular changes caused by interactions between the Earth and the Sun, and changes to the Earth’s surface

 

Working Scientifically

Questioning and predicting

  • identify and pose questions in familiar contexts that can be investigated scientifically
  • make predictions based on prior knowledge (ACSIS053, ACSIS064)

Planning and Conducting Investigations

  • plan scientific investigations with guidance
  • conduct scientific investigations to find answers to questions
  • use appropriate materials and equipment safely (ACSIS054, ACSIS065)
  • consider and apply the elements of fair tests
  • collect and record accurate, honest observations using labelled observational drawings, basic formal measurements and digital technologies as appropriate (ACSIS055, ACSIS066)
  • reflect on investigations, including whether testing was fair or not (ACSIS058, ACSIS069)
  • participate individually and collaboratively with clear roles and goals

Processing and Analysing Data

  • use a range of methods to represent data, including tables and column graphs
  • identify patterns and trends in gathered data (ACSIS057, ACSIS068)
  • compare results with predictions
  • suggest possible reasons for findings (ACSIS215, ACSIS216)

Communicating

  • represent and communicate observations, ideas and findings, using formal and informal representations (ACSIS060, ACSIS071)

 

Maths

Statistics and probability

MA2-18SP selects appropriate methods to collect data, and constructs, compares, interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column graphs

*Coming in 2024

Skill Outcomes

ST3-1WS-S – plans and conducts scientific investigations to answer testable questions, and collects and summarises data to communicate conclusions

ST3-2DP-T – plans and uses materials, tools and equipment to develop solutions for a need or opportunity

ST3-3DP-T – defines problems, and designs, modifies and follows algorithms to develop solutions

 

Living World

ST3-4LW-S – examines how the environment affects the growth, survival and adaptation of living things

 

Physical World*

ST3-9PW-ST – investigates the effects of increasing or decreasing the strength of a specific contact or non-contact force

 

Earth and Space*

ST3-10ES-S – explains regular events in the solar system and geological events on the Earth’s surface

 

Working Scientifically

Questioning and predicting

  • pose testable questions
  • make and justify predictions about scientific investigations (ACSIS231, ACSIS232)

Planning and Conducting Investigations

  • identify questions to investigate scientific ideas
  • plan and apply the elements of scientific investigations to answer problems
  • identify potential risks in planning investigations
  • manage resources safely (ACSIS086, ACSIS103)
  • decide which variable(s) is to be changed, measured and kept the same, in fair tests
  • select appropriate measurement methods, including formal measurements and digital technologies, to record data accurately and honestly (ACSIS087, ACSIS104)
  • reflect on and make suggestions to improve fairness, accuracy and efficacy of a scientific investigation (ACSIS091, ACSIS108)
  • manage investigations effectively, individually and in groups

Processing and Analysing Data

  • construct and use a range of representations, including tables and graphs, to represent and describe observations, patterns or relationships in data
  • employ appropriate technologies to represent data (ACSIS090, ACSIS107)
  • compare data with predictions
  • present data as evidence in developing explanations (ACSIS218, ACSIS221)

Communicating

  • communicate ideas, explanations and processes, using scientific representations including multimodal forms (ACSIS093, ACSIS110)

 

Maths

Statistics and probability

MA3-18SP uses appropriate methods to collect data and constructs, interprets and evaluates data displays, including dot plots, line graphs and two-way tables

*Coming in 2024

Skill Outcomes

SC4-4WS – identifies questions and problems that can be tested or researched and makes predictions based on scientific knowledge

SC4-5WS – collaboratively and individually produces a plan to investigate questions and problems

SC4-6WS – follows a sequence of instructions to safely undertake a range of investigation types, collaboratively and individually

SC4-7WS – processes and analyses data from a first-hand investigation and secondary sources to identify trends, patterns and relationships, and draw conclusions

SC4-8WS – selects and uses appropriate strategies, understanding and skills to produce creative and plausible solutions to identified problems

SC4-9WS – presents science ideas, findings and information to a given audience using appropriate scientific language, text types and representations

 

Living World

SC4-14LW – relates the structure and function of living things to their classification, survival and reproduction

SC4-15LW – explains how new biological evidence changes people’s understanding of the world

 

Physical World*

SC4-10PW – describes the action of unbalanced forces in everyday situations

 

Earth and Space*

SC4-12ES – describes the dynamic nature of models, theories and laws in developing scientific understanding of the Earth and solar system

SC4-13ES – explains how advances in scientific understanding of processes that occur within and on the Earth, influence the choices people make about resource use and management

 

Working Scientifically

Questioning and predicting

        identifies questions and problems that can be tested or researched and makes predictions based on scientific knowledge SC4-4WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-4WS

Content

WS4 Students question and predict by:

  1.     identifying questions and problems that can be investigated scientifically (ACSIS124, ACSIS139)
  2.     making predictions based on scientific knowledge and their own observations (ACSIS124, ACSIS139)

 

Planning Investigations

        collaboratively and individually produces a plan to investigate questions and problems SC4-5WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-5WS

Content

WS5.1 Students identify data to be collected in an investigation by:

  1.     identifying the purpose of an investigation
  2.     proposing the type of information and data that needs to be collected in a range of investigation types, including first-hand and secondary sources  
  3.     locating possible sources of data and information, including secondary sources, relevant to the investigation  

 

WS5.2 Students plan first-hand investigations by:

  1.     collaboratively and individually planning a range of investigation types, including fieldwork, experiments, surveys and research (ACSIS125, ACSIS140)
  2.     outlining a logical procedure for undertaking a range of investigations to collect valid first-hand data, including fair tests
  3.     identifying in fair tests, variables to be controlled (held constant), measured and changed
  4.     describing safety and ethical guidelines to be addressed  

 

WS5.3  Students choose equipment or resources for an investigation by:

  1.     identifying suitable equipment or resources to perform the task, including safety equipment and digital technologies
  2.     selecting equipment to collect data with accuracy appropriate to the task (ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

 

 Conducting Investigations

        follows a sequence of instructions to safely undertake a range of investigation types, collaboratively and individually SC4-6WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-6WS

Content

WS6 Students conduct investigations by:

  1.     collaboratively and individually conducting a range of investigation types, including fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety and ethical guidelines are followed (ACSIS125, ACSIS140)  
  2.     assembling and using appropriate equipment and resources to perform the investigation, including safety equipment
  3.     selecting equipment to collect data with accuracy appropriate to the task (ACSIS126, ACSIS141)
  4.     following the planned procedure, including in fair tests, measuring and controlling variables (ACSIS126, ACSIS141)  
  5.     recording observations and measurements accurately, using appropriate units for physical quantities
  6.     performing specific roles safely and responsibly when working collaboratively to complete a task within the timeline
  7.     assessing the method used and identifying improvements to the method (ACSIS131, ACSIS146)  

 

Processing and analysing data and information

        processes and analyses data from a first-hand investigation and secondary sources to identify trends, patterns and relationships, and draw conclusions SC4-7WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-7WS

Content

WS7.1 Students process data and information by:

  1.     summarising data from students’ own investigations and secondary sources (ACSIS130, ACSIS145)  
  2.     using a range of representations to organise data, including graphs, keys, models, diagrams, tables and spreadsheets
  3.     extracting information from diagrams, flowcharts, tables, databases, other texts, multimedia resources and graphs including histograms and column, sector and line graphs  
  4.     accessing information from a range of sources, including using digital technologies  
  5.     applying simple numerical procedures, eg calculating means when processing data and information, as appropriate

 

WS7.2 Students analyse data and information by:

  1.     checking the reliability of gathered data and information by comparing with observations or information from other sources
  2.     constructing and using a range of representations, including graphs, keys and models to represent and analyse patterns or relationships, including using digital technologies as appropriate (ACSIS129, ACSIS144)    
  3.     identifying data which supports or discounts a question being investigated or a proposed solution to a problem
  4.     using scientific understanding to identify relationships and draw conclusions based on students’ data or secondary sources (ACSIS130, ACSIS145)
  5.     proposing inferences based on presented information and observations
  6.     reflecting on the method used to investigate a question or solve a problem, including evaluating the quality of the data collected (ACSIS131, ACSIS146) 

 

Problem solving

        selects and uses appropriate strategies, understanding and skills to produce creative and plausible solutions to identified problems SC4-8WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-8WS

Content

WS8 Students solve problems by:

  1.     using identified strategies to suggest possible solutions to a familiar problem
  2.     describing different strategies that could be employed to solve an identified problem with a scientific component
  3.     using scientific knowledge and findings from investigations to evaluate claims (ACSIS132, ACSIS234)
  4.     using cause and effect relationships to explain ideas and findings
  5.     evaluating the appropriateness of different strategies for solving an identified problem  

Communicating

        presents science ideas, findings and information to a given audience using appropriate scientific language, text types and representations SC4-9WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-9WS

Content

WS9 Students communicate by:

  1.     presenting ideas, findings and solutions to problems using scientific language and representations using digital technologies as appropriate (ACSIS133, ACSIS148)  
  2.     using appropriate text types in presentations, including a discussion, explanation, exposition, procedure and recount
  3.     using a recognised method to acknowledge sources of data and information
  4.     constructing and using a range of representations to honestly, clearly and/or succinctly present data and information including diagrams, keys, models, tables, drawings, images, flowcharts, spreadsheets and databases    

e.     constructing and using the appropriate type of graph (histogram, column, sector or line graph) to express relationships clearly and succinctly, employing digital technologies as appropriate 

Maths

Statistics and probability

MA4-19SP collects, represents and interprets single sets of data, using appropriate statistical displays

MA4-20SP analyses single sets of data using measures of location, and range

*Coming in 2024

Skill Outcomes

SC5-4WS – develops questions or hypotheses to be investigated scientifically

SC5-5WS – produces a plan to investigate identified questions, hypotheses or problems, individually and collaboratively

SC5-6WS – undertakes first-hand investigations to collect valid and reliable data and information, individually and collaboratively

SC5-7WS – processes, analyses and evaluates data from first-hand investigations and secondary sources to develop evidence-based arguments and conclusions

SC5-8WS – applies scientific understanding and critical thinking skills to suggest possible solutions to identified problems

SC5-9WS – presents science ideas and evidence for a particular purpose and to a specific audience, using appropriate scientific language, conventions and representations

 

Living World

SC5-14LW – analyses interactions between components and processes within biological systems

SC5-15LW – explains how biological understanding has advanced through scientific discoveries, technological developments and the needs of society

 

Physical World

SC5-10PW – applies models, theories and laws to explain situations involving energy, force and motion

SC5-11PW – explains how scientific understanding about energy conservation, transfers and transformations is applied in systems

 

Earth and Space

SC5-13ES – explains how scientific knowledge about global patterns of geological activity and interactions involving global systems can be used to inform decisions related to contemporary issues

 

Working Scientifically

Questioning and predicting

›    develops questions or hypotheses to be investigated scientifically SC5-4WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-4WS

 

Content

WS4 Students question and predict by:

  1.   formulating questions or hypotheses that can be investigated scientifically (ACSIS164, ACSIS198)  
  2.   predicting outcomes based on observations and scientific knowledge

Planning investigations

›    produces a plan to investigate identified questions, hypotheses or problems, individually and collaboratively SC5-5WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-5WS

 

Content

WS5.1 Students identify data to be collected for an investigation by:

  1.   describing the purpose of an investigation
  2.   explaining why certain types of information need to be collected in a range of investigation types    
  3.   selecting possible sources of data, including secondary sources, relevant to the investigation
  4.   justifying why variables need to be kept constant if reliable first-hand data is to be collected in controlled experiments

 

WS5.2 Students plan first-hand investigations by:

  1.   planning and selecting appropriate investigation methods, including fieldwork and laboratory experimentation, to collect reliable data (ACSIS165, ACSIS199)
  2.   describing a logical procedure for undertaking a range of investigation types
  3.   designing controlled experiments to collect valid first-hand data
  4.   specifying the dependent and independent variables for controlled experiments
  5.   accounting for the use of an experimental control as appropriate

 

WS5.3 Students choose equipment or resources for an investigation by:

  1.   identifying appropriate equipment and materials
  2.   identifying the appropriate units to be used in collecting data  
  3.   selecting equipment to collect and record reliable data or information, using digital technologies as appropriate, eg data loggers    
  4.   assessing risks and addressing ethical issues associated with these methods (ACSIS165, ACSIS199)    

Conducting investigations

›    undertakes first-hand investigations to collect valid and reliable data and information, individually and collaboratively SC5-6WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-6WS

 

Content

WS6    Students conduct investigations by:

  1.   individually and collaboratively using appropriate investigation methods, including fieldwork and laboratory experimentation, to collect reliable data (ACSIS165, ACSIS199)  
  2.   safely constructing, assembling and manipulating identified equipment  
  3.   selecting and using appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data (ACSIS166, ACSIS200)    
  4.   using appropriate units for measuring physical quantities  
  5.   reporting data and information, evidence and findings, with accuracy and honesty  
  6.   evaluating the effectiveness of the planned procedure, considering risk factors and ethical issues, and suggesting improvements as appropriate

Processing and analysing data and information

›    processes, analyses and evaluates data from first-hand investigations and secondary sources to develop evidence-based arguments and conclusions SC5-7WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-7WS

 

Content

WS7.1 Students process data and information by:

  1.   selecting and using a variety of methods to organise data and information including diagrams, tables, models, spreadsheets and databases
  2.   selecting and extracting information from tables, flow diagrams, other texts, audiovisual resources and graphs, including histograms and column, sector or line graphs  
  3.   accessing data and information by using a range of appropriate digital technologies  
  4.   applying numerical procedures and mathematical concepts and using digital technologies, where appropriate
  5.   identifying data which supports or discounts a question or hypothesis being investigated or a proposed solution to a problem  
  6.   describing specific ways to improve the quality of the data (ACSIS171, ACSIS205)

 

WS7.2 Students analyse data and information by:

  1.   analysing patterns and trends, including identifying inconsistencies in data and information (ACSIS169, ACSIS203)    
  2.   describing relationships between variables (ACSIS169, ACSIS203)  
  3.   assessing the validity and reliability of first-hand data  
  4.   using knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence (ACSIS170, ACSIS204)
  5.   synthesising data and information to develop evidence-based arguments
  6.   evaluating conclusions and evidence, including identifying sources of uncertainty and possible alternative explanations (ACSIS171, ACSIS205)  
  7.   critically analysing the validity of information from secondary sources (ACSIS172, ACSIS206)  

Problem Solving

›    applies scientific understanding and critical thinking skills to suggest possible solutions to identified problems SC5-8WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-8WS

 

Content

WS8    Students solve problems by:

  1.   describing strategies to develop a range of possible solutions to an identified problem
  2.   assessing strategies that have been identified as possible solutions to an identified problem
  3.   applying the processes of Working Scientifically in developing creative solutions to problems
  4.   using cause-and-effect relationships to explain ideas
  5.   using models to explain phenomena and make predictions    
  6.   applying critical thinking in considering suggested proposals, solutions and conclusions, including a consideration of risk  
  7.   evaluating different approaches used to solve problems (ACSIS172, ACSIS206)

Communicating

›    presents science ideas and evidence for a particular purpose and to a specific audience, using appropriate scientific language, conventions and representations SC5-9WS – Related Life Skills outcome: SCLS-9WS

 

Content

WS9    Students communicate by:

  1.   selecting and using in presentations, for different purposes and contexts, appropriate text types including discussions, explanations, expositions, procedures, recounts or reports  
  2.   selecting and constructing an appropriate table, type of diagram, table or graph (histogram or sector, column or line graph) to present information and show relationships clearly and succinctly using digital technologies as appropriate
  3.   using appropriate units for physical quantities and symbols to express relationships, including mathematical ones  
  4.   proposing ideas that demonstrate coherence and logical progression    
  5.   presenting scientific ideas and information for a particular purpose, including constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions and representations for specific audiences (ACSIS174, ACSIS208)  

 

Maths

Statistics and probability

MA5.1-12SP uses statistical displays to compare sets of data, and evaluates statistical claims made in the media

MA5.2-15SP uses quartiles and box plots to compare sets of data, and evaluates sources of data

MA5.2-16SP investigates relationships between two statistical variables, including their relationship over time

MA5.3-18SP uses standard deviation to analyse data

MA5.3-19SP investigates the relationship between numerical variables using lines of best fit, and explores how data is used to inform decision-making processes

*Coming in 2024

Module 3: Biological Diversity

›        develops and evaluates questions and hypotheses for scientific investigation BIO11/12-1

›        designs and evaluates investigations in order to obtain primary and secondary data and information BIO11/12-2

›        communicates scientific understanding using suitable language and terminology for a specific audience or purpose BIO11/12-7

›        describes biological diversity by explaining the relationships between a range of organisms in terms of specialisation for selected habitats and evolution of species BIO11-10

 

Effects of the Environment on Organisms

Inquiry question: How do environmental pressures promote a change in species diversity and abundance?

 

Students:

  • predict the effects of selection pressures on organisms in ecosystems, including: (ACSBL026, ACSBL090)  

–      biotic factors

–      abiotic factors

  • investigate changes in a population of organisms due to selection pressures over time, for example: (ACSBL002, ACSBL094)        

–      cane toads in Australia

–      prickly pear distribution in Australia

 

Adaptations

Inquiry question: How do adaptations increase the organism’s ability to survive?

 

Students:

  • conduct practical investigations, individually or in teams, or use secondary sources to examine the adaptations of organisms that increase their ability to survive in their environment, including:    

–      structural adaptations

–      physiological adaptations

–      behavioural adaptations

  • investigate, through secondary sources, the observations and collection of data that were obtained by Charles Darwin to support the Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection, for example:

–  finches of the Galapagos Islands

–  Australian flora and fauna

 

Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection

Inquiry question: What is the relationship between evolution and biodiversity?

 

Students:

  • explain biological diversity in terms of the Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection by examining the changes in and diversification of life since it first appeared on the Earth (ACSBL088)
  • analyse how an accumulation of microevolutionary changes can drive evolutionary changes and speciation over time, for example: (ACSBL034, ACSBL093)  

–      evolution of the horse

–      evolution of the platypus

  • explain, using examples, how Darwin and Wallace’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection accounts for:

–      convergent evolution

–      divergent evolution

  • explain how punctuated equilibrium is different from the gradual process of natural selection

 

Evolution – the Evidence

Inquiry question: What is the evidence that supports the Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection?

 

Students:

  • investigate, using secondary sources, evidence in support of Darwin and Wallace’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection, including but not limited to:  

–      biochemical evidence, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology and biogeography (ACSBL089)  

–      techniques used to date fossils and the evidence produced  

  • explain modern-day examples that demonstrate evolutionary change, for example:  

–      the cane toad

–      antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria

 

Module 4: Ecosystem Dynamics

›        develops and evaluates questions and hypotheses for scientific investigation BIO11/12-1

›        designs and evaluates investigations in order to obtain primary and secondary data and information BIO11/12-2

›        conducts investigations to collect valid and reliable primary and secondary data and information BIO11/12-3

›        selects and processes appropriate qualitative and quantitative data and information using a range of appropriate media BIO11/12-4

›        analyses and evaluates primary and secondary data and information BIO11/12-5

›        analyses ecosystem dynamics and the interrelationships of organisms within the ecosystem BIO11-11

 

Population Dynamics

Inquiry question: What effect can one species have on the other species in a community?

 

Students:

  • investigate and determine relationships between biotic and abiotic factors in an ecosystem, including: (ACSBL019)        

–      the impact of abiotic factors (ACSBL021, ACSBL022, ACSBL025)

–      the impact of biotic factors, including predation, competition and symbiotic relationships (ACSBL024)

–      the ecological niches occupied by species (ACSBL023)

–      predicting consequences for populations in ecosystems due to predation, competition, symbiosis and disease (ACSBL019, ACSBL020)

–      measuring populations of organisms using sampling techniques (ACSBL003, ACSBL015)  

  • explain a recent extinction event (ACSBL024)  

 

Past Ecosystems

Inquiry question: How do selection pressures within an ecosystem influence evolutionary change?

 

Students:

  •     analyse palaeontological and geological evidence that can be used to provide evidence for past changes in ecosystems, including but not limited to:  

      Aboriginal rock paintings

      rock structure and formation

      ice core drilling

  •     investigate and analyse past and present technologies that have been used to determine evidence for past changes, for example: (ACSBL005)

      radiometric dating

      gas analysis

  •     analyse evidence that present-day organisms have evolved from organisms in the past by examining and interpreting a range of secondary sources to evaluate processes, claims and conclusions relating to the evolution of organisms in Australia, for example: (ACSBL005, ACSBL027)  

      small mammals

      sclerophyll plants

  •     investigate the reasons for changes in past ecosystems, by:

      interpreting a range of secondary sources to develop an understanding of the changes in biotic and abiotic factors over short and long periods of time (ACSBL025, ACSBL026)

      evaluating hypotheses that account for identified trends (ACSBL001)

Future Ecosystems

Inquiry question: How can human activity impact on an ecosystem?

 

Students:

  •  investigate changes in past ecosystems that may inform our approach to the management of future ecosystems, including:

–      the role of human-induced selection pressures on the extinction of species (ACSBL005, ACSBL028, ACSBL095)   

–      models that humans can use to predict future impacts on biodiversity (ACSBL029, ACSBL071)      

–      the role of changing climate on ecosystems

  • investigate practices used to restore damaged ecosystems, Country or Place, for example:  

–      mining sites

–      land degradation from agricultural practices

 

Module 5: Heredity

        selects and processes appropriate qualitative and quantitative data and information using a range of appropriate media BIO11/12-4

        analyses and evaluates primary and secondary data and information BIO11/12-5

        solves scientific problems using primary and secondary data, critical thinking skills and scientific processes BIO11/12-6

        explains the structures of DNA and analyses the mechanisms of inheritance and how processes of reproduction ensure continuity of species BIO12-12

Reproduction

Inquiry question: How does reproduction ensure the continuity of a species?

 

Students:

  •  explain the mechanisms of reproduction that ensure the continuity of a species, by analysing sexual and asexual methods of reproduction in a variety of organisms, including but not limited to:

–      animals: advantages of external and internal fertilisation

–      plants: asexual and sexual reproduction

–      fungi: budding, spores

–      bacteria: binary fission (ACSBL075)

–      protists: binary fission, budding

  • analyse the features of fertilisation, implantation and hormonal control of pregnancy and birth in mammals (ACSBL075)  
  • evaluate the impact of scientific knowledge on the manipulation of plant and animal reproduction in agriculture (ACSBL074)  

 

Genetic Variation

Inquiry question: How can the genetic similarities and differences within and between species be compared?

 

Students:

  • conduct practical investigations to predict variations in the genotype of offspring by modelling meiosis, including the crossing over of homologous chromosomes, fertilisation and mutations (ACSBL084)
  • model the formation of new combinations of genotypes produced during meiosis, including but not limited to:

–      interpreting examples of autosomal, sex-linkage, co-dominance, incomplete dominance and multiple alleles (ACSBL085)

–      constructing and interpreting information and data from pedigrees and Punnett squares

  • collect, record and present data to represent frequencies of characteristics in a population, in order to identify trends, patterns, relationships and limitations in data, for example:  

–      examining frequency data

–      analysing single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)

Inheritance Patterns in a Population

Inquiry question: Can population genetic patterns be predicted with any accuracy?

 

Students:

  •     investigate the use of technologies to determine inheritance patterns in a population using, for example: (ACSBL064, ACSBL085)

  DNA sequencing and profiling (ACSBL086)

  •     investigate the use of data analysis from a large-scale collaborative project to identify trends, patterns and relationships,  for example: (ACSBL064, ACSBL073)      

      the use of population genetics data in conservation management

      population genetics studies used to determine the inheritance of a disease or disorder    

      population genetics relating to human evolution  

 

 

Module 6: Genetic Change

›        solves scientific problems using primary and secondary data, critical thinking skills and scientific processes BIO11/12-6

›        communicates scientific understanding using suitable language and terminology for a specific audience or purpose BIO11/12-7

›        explains natural genetic change and the use of genetic technologies to induce genetic change BIO12-13

Mutation

Inquiry question: How does mutation introduce new alleles into a population?

 

Students:

  • explain how a range of mutagens operate, including but not limited to:

–      electromagnetic radiation sources

–      chemicals

–      naturally occurring mutagens

  • compare the causes, processes and effects of different types of mutation, including but not limited to:  

–      point mutation

–      chromosomal mutation

  • distinguish between somatic mutations and germ-line mutations and their effect on an organism   (ACSBL082, ACSBL083)
  • assess the significance of ‘coding’ and ‘non-coding’ DNA segments in the process of mutation (ACSBL078)  
  • investigate the causes of genetic variation relating to the processes of fertilisation, meiosis and mutation (ACSBL078)
  • evaluate the effect of mutation, gene flow and genetic drift on the gene pool of populations (ACSBL091, ACSBL092)